Terminator: Dark Fate (2019)

Terminator: Dark Fate

2019/10/23 128 min. Action , Science Fiction

Natalia Reyes , Mackenzie Davis , Linda Hamilton , Gabriel Luna , Arnold Schwarzenegger , Diego Boneta , Fraser James , Alicia Borrachero , Enrique Arce , Edward Furlong

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Overview

Terminator was a film that caused a great impact when it was released back in 1984. Its sequel, with more budget, made Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) to be considered one of the best action tapes in history. And they all had three main ingredients: Linda Hamilton, Arnold Schwarzenegger and James Cameron. Once some of these pieces began to fail, we had irregular deliveries that began to make the general plot of this apocalyptic fiction story increasingly confusing.

Terminator: Dark Fate is a crossroads of generations. We have an impeccable Linda Hamilton who, at 63 years old still manages to be convincing as an action hero. 

Next to Mackenzie Davis as Grace, an augmented human or in other words: a human/machine hybrid, who has the mission of protecting Dani Ramos (Natalia Reyes), on whom the future depends. So far, everything has a feeling of familiarity, with inverted roles, paper changes, but the story is essentially the same as we already know.

In essence, beyond almost tracing the old narrative structure, Terminator: Dark Fate triumphs by repeating what worked in the past. First, the protagonist of the film does not have to be Arnold, and in fact, less is more in this regard. Second, the true role of T1 and T2 was Sarah Connor, and here she becomes more acidic than ever and well accompanied. The leading trio, in its escape mission, has incredible chemistry and the three performances are up to par. Mackenzie Davis makes us think that she would have been a great Captain Marvel and Natalia Reyes is the perfect example of the character's evolution from fragile to stubborn and will surely have much more weight in the two sequels that are planned.

On the opposite side, we have more doubts. Gabriel Luna is the aspect that has been given to that exterminator shapeshifters and, frankly, fails to impose. They need to abuse his threatening figure too much as a machine —exoskeleton and "skin" can go separately thanks to nanotechnology—. It is a pity because it reduces credibility to the matter and all that feeling of invincibility we have to associate it with the machine. Arnold's shadow is very elongated in that sense, although it has not been reused as in Genesis.

The film, although its history is not excessively complex or for those who have missed some iteration of the franchise, abuses a narrative that needs to rely on certain flashbacks and flashforwards with the intention of creating certain plot twists, although the result does not end being effective for anything. Far from being surprising, Dark Fate is predictable.

In general, Terminator: Dark Fate is a film that achieves exactly what Paramount proposed when it decided to discard the sequels planned for Genesis: return to the roots of one of the most important cinematographic milestones of the cinema of action and science fiction.

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