Zombieland: Double Tap (2019)

Zombieland: Double Tap

2019/10/9 99 min. Action , Comedy , Horror

Woody Harrelson , Jesse Eisenberg , Emma Stone , Abigail Breslin , Zoey Deutch , Avan Jogia , Rosario Dawson , Luke Wilson , Thomas Middleditch , Victoria Hall

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Overview

Among all the dubious practices carried out in present-day Hollywood - which are many - few cause more cold sweat to the cinephile collective than the announcement of a late sequel to any successful movie, and this time there's a movie that many people loved a decade ago now. And it is that in these types of projects they represent a perfect opportunity to defenestrate original ideas with excessive reformulations or, on the contrary, clinging excessively to a past that has not sat too well over time.

The initial sequence of credits of 'Zombieland: Double Tap' - which is (worth mentioning) a terrible name for translating it into good titles in other markets like the hispanic one, a huge market that has a terrible, not so cool title for the movie, and this has caused a lot of complaint. - heiress of the introduction of the hilarious 'Welcome to Zombieland' from 2009 and shot in glorious slow-motion to the rhythm of 'Master of Puppets', gives us a good clue of the continuists and not at all risky paths through which this chapter will circulate, and that itself is a risky bet to make, because you have to be completely sure wether if the premise of the first film still would stand out in a world that has changed since then, especially when we're talking about a sequel to a movie that was first launched a decade ago.

However, despite the feeling of repetition that the film transmits during its first bars, Ruben Fleischer has managed to include enough news to the new adventure of Columbus, Tallahassee and company, to avoid the stench of undead; offering a refreshing action comedy that will delight those who seek a passing entertainment from the hand of really charming characters.

Opening scenes apart, it is not necessary more than a few minutes immersed in the new 'Zombieland' to realize that this installment of the now franchise explodes again the formulas and patterns that operated as a clock to the original film; something that extends equally to aspects related to form, such as those that focus on the tone and style of the narrative.

In this way, we find ourselves once again facing a hypervitaminated cocktail of frantic action, with an agile and disheveled chamber work, incessant and run over dialogues, infographics that flood the screen... A bombardment of audiovisual stimuli that, seasoned with a light touch of casserole and a moderate spectacularity, involve a sense of humor that, more or less like, refuses to take breaths or prisoners.

But if this string of elements works without complications, plus the small additions in the form of new faces and new factors that alter the status of the post-apocalyptic North America, it is thanks to round characters. An assortment of protagonists, interpreted by an outstanding cast, that rise as the real stars of the function, and whom we have missed quite a lot during the last decade.

Of course, 'Zombieland 2: Double Tap' is far from perfect; something that is reflected in a slightly syncopated narrative - its second act seems more extensive than it should - and in a somewhat irritating whiteness, which tries to make up with foul language and heads exploding the discourse on the concept of the family, child and little in line with the general tone, on which the film revolves.

But if we ignore these specific highs and lows - and the fact that 'Shaun of the Dead' continues to be the unbeatable queen of zombie comedy - it is rigorously praised how Fleischer's latest work makes many of us dreaming of a new trip to 'Zombieland' within another ten years, in times when sequels and soulless remakes are the order of the day.

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